by Matt Margolis

News broke Friday that Apple acquired Luxvue Technology Corporation for an undisclosed amount of money.  Luxvue  Technology was unknown to nearly everyone until their acquisition by Apple put them in the spot light.   I think the biggest question you want to know is, how can I make money from this?

According to Crunchbase Luxvue Technology was incorporated in 2009, based in Santa Clara, California and they develop low-power, micronLED based displays for consumer electronics applications.

LuxVue Technology Corporation develops low-power, microLED-based displays for consumer electronics applications. LuxVue Technology Corporation was formerly known as Papierlos Corporation. The company was incorporated in 2009 and is based in Santa Clara, California.

LuxVue Technology Corporation develops low-power, microLED-based displays for consumer electronics applications. LuxVue Technology Corporation was formerly known as Papierlos Corporation. The company was incorporated in 2009 and is based in Santa Clara, California. – See more at: http://www.crunchbase.com/organization/luxvue-technology#sthash.iBHexiMz.dpuf
LuxVue Technology Corporation develops low-power, microLED-based displays for consumer electronics applications. LuxVue Technology Corporation was formerly known as Papierlos Corporation. The company was incorporated in 2009 and is based in Santa Clara, California. – See more at: http://www.crunchbase.com/organization/luxvue-technology#sthash.iBHexiMz.dpuf

LED is very interesting topic, first of all LED is more efficient than fluorescent lights.  Second of all, LED is becoming the standard light bulb all around the world, one bulb at a time.  One of the most vital ingredients in LED lighting is sapphire. What makes sapphire so special?

Synthetic single-crystal sapphire is a single crystal form of corundum, Al2O3, also known as alpha-alumina, alumina, and single crystal Al2O3. Sapphire is aluminum oxide in the purest form with no porosity or grain boundaries, making it theoretically dense. The combination of favorable chemical, electrical, mechanical, optical, surface, thermal, and durability properties make sapphire a preferred material for high performance system and component designs.

One of the biggest issues with battery life are displays that drain your battery just from emitting light.  LED lights are known for their durability, low energy consumption and long-lasting life span.  What if an electronic device display shared was also composed of LED?  How much many hours would be added to your battery per charge?

Apple’s sapphire partner GT Advanced Technologies is currently producing sapphire for consumer electronics as well as the LED industry (LED customers currently exclude Apple).  GT is an expert in producing sapphire for LED as well as sapphire for consumer electronics.  The sapphire used for LED lighting does not need to be as perfect because it’s not the same as a sapphire cover screen that you look through to see your display.  The sapphire layer is the body (bottom) layer that the LED display would be stacked on.

Apple acquired LuxVue Technology along with its long list of patents.  One of the patents that sparked my interest was Luxvue’s (now Apple’s) LED Array patent.  What is interesting about this patent is that the bottom layer that makes up the LED display includes not only sapphire as an option but also SiC (Silicon Carbide).  According to the patent both materials can be transparent, but currently sapphire is drastically less expensive of the two options but SiC has a significant performance benefit over sapphire.   SiC most likely won’t reach consumer electronic products for several years (5?, 10?, 15? years) at the earliest, but the switch from Si (Silicon) to SiC (Silicon Carbide) is currently underway in Power Electronics.

Conclusion

  • In 2014 Apple is going to be the first high volume consumer electronics manufacturer to cover its devices with sapphire.
  • Apple is going to adopt LED displays within the next 12 to 18 months across its portfolio of iDevices
  • GT Advanced Technologies will produce and process hundreds of millions of sapphire substrates annually that will end up below Apple’s LED displays before the end of 2015.
  • Apple’s adoption of LED displays will add a “new significant layer” of reoccurring revenue to GT’s top line before the end of 2015
  • The relationship between GT Advanced Technologies and Apple goes much deeper than just sapphire cover screens

 

For your reading pleasure Luxvue’s (now Apple’s) LED Array patent is highlighted below.

A micro light emitting diode (LED) and a method of forming an array of micro LEDs for transfer to a receiving substrate are described. For example, the receiving substrate may be, but is not limited to, a display substrate, a lighting substrate, a substrate with functional devices such as transistors or integrated circuits (ICs), or a substrate with metal redistribution lines. In an embodiment, a micro LED structure includes a micro p-n diode, a reflective metallization stack below a bottom surface of the micro p-n diode, and an electrically insulating spacer spanning a portion of sidewalls of the reflective metallization stack and laterally surrounding the reflective metallization stack, where the reflective metallization stack is between the micro p-n diode and a bonding layer formed on a substrate. In an embodiment, the bonding layer has a liquidus temperature of approximately 350° C. or lower, and more specifically approximately 200° C. or lower. In an embodiment, the bonding layer is an alloy bonding layer. For example, the bonding layer may be an indium-silver (InAg) alloy. Depending upon the manner of formation, the bonding layer can have a uniform concentration, or a gradient concentration.

In a particular embodiment, growth substrate 101 is sapphire, and the p-n diode layer 110 is formed of GaN. Despite the fact that sapphire has a larger lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient mismatch with respect to GaN, sapphire is reasonably low cost, widely available and its transparency is compatible with excimer laser-based lift-off (LLO) techniques. In another embodiment, another material such as SiC may be used as the growth substrate 101 for a GaN p-n diode layer 110. Like sapphire, SiC substrates may be transparent. Several growth techniques may be used for growth of p-n diode layer 110 such as metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). GaN, for example, can be grown by simultaneously introducing trimethylgallium (TMGa) and ammonia (NH3) precursors into a reaction chamber with the sapphire growth substrate 101 being heated to an elevated temperature such as 800° C. to 1,000° C. In the particular embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1A, p-n diode layer 110 may include a bulk GaN layer 112, an n-doped layer 114, a quantum well 116 and p-doped layer 118. The bulk GaN layer 112 may be n-doped due to silicon or oxygen contamination, or intentionally doped with a donor such as silicon. N-doped GaN layer 114 may likewise be doped with a donor such as silicon, while p-doped layer 118 may be doped with an acceptor such as magnesium. A variety of alternative p-n diode configurations may be utilized to form p-n diode layer 110. Likewise, a variety of single quantum well (SQW) or multiple quantum well (MQW) configurations may be utilized to form quantum well 116. In addition, various buffer layers may be included as appropriate. In one embodiment, the sapphire growth substrate 101 has a thickness of approximately 200 μm, bulk GaN layer 112 has a thickness of approximately 0.5 μm-5 μm, n-doped layer 114 has a thickness of approximately 0.1 μm-3 μm, quantum well layer 116 has a thickness less than approximately 0.3 μm and p-doped layer 118 has a thickness of approximately 0.1 μm-1 μm.

In the Figure below a layer of Sapphire and or SiC is represented by “101”

LED Display

 

Full Disclosure: I am long GTAT and Apple’s newest acquisition will result in a “new significant layer” of reoccurring sapphire revenue from Apple, which is likely to begin before the end of 2015.

 

 

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Comments
  1. Scott Mantz says:

    That is some impressive info, Matt! Very encouraging….

    amazing technology.

    Like

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